…completely detached from the syllabus

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A new voice for our blog today. Harry, one of the Yr 13 boys, shares his thoughts on the library:

The knowledge that can be found in books is the primary source of their appeal, novels are important too but my interest is more often than not directed towards the non-fiction shelves. The library is valuable not only for reading around syllabuses, especially as a first point of reference for individual studies such as history coursework (the stock of Very Short Introductions in particular), but also as a place to generally broaden horizons in a way completely detached from the syllabus. Tim Marshall’s ‘Prisoners of Geography’ for example provides a fascinating interpretation of geopolitics based on a geographic determinism that, while dubious at times, is rather illuminating and certainly thought provoking. The reference section is also important, feeding a fondness for apparently useless facts and obscure information, dictionaries of quotations or subjects as esoteric as the burial places of famous people are always wonderful diversions. Building a wider knowledge and understanding of the world, with history as a main focus, has therefore been the biggest influence that books have had on my life from a young age to now and in the future.

5 line reviews

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We had some fun writing 5 line reviews of some books in the last of the Reading Boon sessions today.

The format is 5 lines with the fist being 2-3 words long, the second 4-5 words, third 6-7 words, fourth 8-9 and the fifth just 2-3 words again. We gave the boys 15 minutes to come up with the following:

A Game of Thrones, George R R Martin

Please, stop it

Please, just stop it

Please, just stop killing them already

You are going to run out of characters soon

Calm down George.

and:

Dangerous paths

Large mysterious land

Deception lies around every corner

Puts you on the edge with every turn of the page

You win, or you die.

Dracula, Bram Stoker

A thrilling tale

A story of blood and corruption

Strong themes of reverse colonisation

A story with one of the most iconic antagonists in literature

Life versus death.

Stormbreaker, Anthony Horowitz

A normal boy?

A life turned upside down

A mental immigrant who wants murder

A spying agency wants a boy to save England

Who wins?

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Stieg Larsson

Conspiracy theory

Washout journalist, secretive PI

Investigating a folklore serial killer

Tensions rise as protagonists edge closer to truth

Who are they?

Shutter Island, Dennis Lehane

Shutter Island

Killer on the loose

Deepening investigation with hurricane closing in

Closer they get to the truth, more mystery

Insanity awaits.

Big thanks to Mark Warner, Deputy Head at Patcham High School for the 5 line idea and the inspiration to try it and to Louis, Dennis, Angus, Harry and Jacob for their efforts.

It’s been busy

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Lent has been a busy time here in the Wodehouse Library.

Year 11s spent two of their wellbeing lessons with us learning about plagiarism avoidance using the study skills books and the Encyclopedia Britannica online resource.

Year 9 boys also visited the library for two lessons to work on their history projects. During these lessons boys used Ormiston (the Dulwich College Register) and the Dulwich College War Record, Ancestry.com and other online resources to research an OA who was killed during World War 1.

This year’s Free Learning Day for year 10 saw the Library and Archives team up to deliver 5 sessions exploring Christopher Marlowe’s connections to Dulwich College, conspiracy theories, fake news and fact-checking.

As part of the Trinity Schools Group, Dulwich College hosted the TSBA ceremony which saw author Stewart Foster win with his novel Bubble Boy.

We’ve maintained the usual displays of fiction and non-fiction in and around the library, added new stock and been glad of the continued help of prefects and pupil librarians with on-going weeding and tidying projects. We’re looking forward to seeing both boys and staff over the next few days choosing holiday reading!

Have a great Easter break, everyone, and see you in the Summer Term.

And the winner is…

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No golden envelope hiccups here at Dulwich College as the Master, Dr Joe Spence, announced Stewart Foster as winner of the Trinity Schools Book Award for 2017.

The event was live tweeted with #tsba2017 if you want to check out the Twitter photos and you can read the TSBA blog write up here

It was a great evening with lots of enthusiasm for reading and writing. Both authors, Stewart Foster and Diana Hendry (The Seeing) gave thoughtful and thought-provoking answers to the questions that the students from participating schools had submitted for the Q&A session. In particular we enjoyed hearing about the books which had captured their young imaginations and how hearing their characters speak helps them move the story along.

Many thanks to all the sponsors for the goody bags, the staff and pupils who helped out on the day, the authors and their teams and most of all to all the students who read the stories, voted and came along to the ceremony.

Anticipation is mounting… #tsba2017

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We can’t believe it’s nearly time to announce the winners!

And it isn’t only the authors who can anticipate being prize winners on Tuesday evening as there are also prizes for the students who submit the Best Review and the Best Creative Response to a shortlisted book.

The fun will start in the Lower Hall with refreshments before we all head up to the Great Hall for the award ceremony, starting with those student winners (good luck to all have submitted entries!).

Before the announcement of the winning book there will be an authors’ panel session at which our special guests will answer questions. After the winner has been revealed and the applause has died down there’ll be a chance to meet the authors, pick up a goody bag* and take a look at all the creative responses which will be on display in the Lower Hall.

So, here as promised, are the remaining shortlisted books (again, no clues here for the winner):

There Will Be Lies, by Nick Lake

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She Is Not Invisible, by Marcus Sedgwick

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The Smell of Other People’s Houses, by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock

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Not If I See You First, by Eric Lindstrom

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The Knife of Never Letting Go, by Patrick Ness

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Many thanks to all the sponsors of the goody bags:

Faber & Faber, HarperCollins Children’s Books, Penguin Random House, Quercus Children’s Books, Simon and Schuster, Walker Books, and Browns Books for Students.

Not long now…

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The Trinity Schools Book Award Prize Ceremony will be held at Dulwich College on Tuesday 7th March 2017.

There are 7 books on the TSBA shortlist and there have been some marvellous creative responses to them from students in all the schools participating in the awards voting.

Over the next week, we’ll feature each of the books (in no particular order so there’ll be no hint as to the winner!).

The Seeing by Diana Hendry

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You can find some reviews which have been posted to the TSBA blog here

Bubble Boy by Stewart Foster

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More reviews from the TSBA blog here

Look out for more over the next few days 🙂

Archives and Library

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The Year 9 History Project is underway in the Wodehouse Library.

Either side of half term we’ll be welcoming Year 9 classes into the Wodehouse Library for the ‘Old Alleynians & the Great War’ Year 9 History Project.

Each Year 9 boy has been allocated an OA to research and their library sessions will offer them a chance to use Dulwich College Archive materials, such as Ormiston (a record which offers a summary of every OA since 1619). Boys will also use the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website to find memorials and final resting places of the OAs they are learning about with a little family history being added by the 1911 Census on Ancestry Library.

The project also prompts boys to look at more of our online resources, like the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ONDB) and undertake some detective work on sites around the school campus too.

9t-history-project-books 9t-history-project