The Economist

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One of the first recommendations made to A-level students is to make use of the press to keep up-to-date with current affairs.

Here at DC we subscribe to a range of newspapers and periodicals in print and digital formats. All digital content can be accessed via your MyDulwich homepage e-resources menu.

The Economist offers a handy Google search box on its website which means that we can swiftly find articles from its archive without having to sift through back issues (although these are available in the Reference Section of the Wodehouse Library).

Since the search is facilitated by Google we have to think smartly about the search we make in order to achieve a manageable number of results. So, for example, if we type far right politics in the search box of The Economist’s website we get 40,000 results and our search refiner tools are only ‘relevance‘ and ‘date‘ which means we need to alter our search a little.

Adding speech marks to our search term (i.e.: “far right politics“) makes Google look for the exact phrase in The Economist’s archive and reduces our results to just 80, which is still a lot but short abstracts and article titles help us to choose which results might be helpful in our research and if we’re tracing how an event or issue has progressed over time we can re-order our results by date.

Once we’ve decided an article is useful to us we can e-mail the details of it or print it, either method allowing us to keep track of the bibliographic data we need to present if we use ideas or quotes from the piece.

The Economist’s online archive goes back to the late 1990s and the website offers users access to content that wouldn’t be found in the print edition so it’s worth considering using this e-resource as a supplement to your regular reading.

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One thought on “The Economist

    […] Day is about current affairs – remember when we wrote about The Economist we said it’s usually recommended that anybody intending to study A-levels and beyond keeps […]

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